Easter Sunday

Wake up and worship with us on Easter! We’ll serve you breakfast at 8:15 a.m. in our Fellowship Hall, followed by a celebration in our courtyard (weather permitting) where we will “flower the Cross.” We’ll have Bible study for all ages at 9:10 a.m. — our greeters can help you find your way. Easter Worship begins at 10:30 a.m. in the Sanctuary. The service will include our adult choir and brass ensemble. Childcare is provided for infants through third graders. Everyone is welcomed!

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Cover It Is Finished Musical

Maundy Thursday Tenebrae Service

Cover It Is Finished Musical
This Holy Week, come join our Worship Choir as they present Mary McDonald’s powerful work, “It Is Finished,” in collaboration with the Joy Paige Dance Company of Cary. This beautiful musical work will be choreographed by Sarah Otto from the Graceful Expressions Dance Company in Cary.
This worship experience will be on Thursday, April 18, at 7:00 p.m. in the sanctuary at Woodhaven, 4000 Kildaire Farm Road in Apex. Community members, guests and friends are welcomed.
Tenebrae is a special service for Holy Week that is held on any of the three days prior to Easter: Wednesday, Maundy Thursday or Good Friday. Tenebrae comes from Latin meaning “shadows” or “darkness.” The service makes use of gradually diminishing light through the extinguishing of candles to symbolize the events of that week from Jesus’ triumphant entry into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday through his burial.
This increasing darkness foreshadows Jesus’ approaching death and of the hopelessness that will be in the world without God. The service concludes in darkness with worshipers leaving in silence to ponder the impact of Christ’s death and to await the coming Resurrection. Come, worship with us as we experience Christ’s journey to the cross through music and interpretive dance!

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Kids’ Palm Sunday Celebration

Calling all children and preschoolers! It’s time to mark your calendars. (Do preschoolers really have calendars these days?) We’ll have our Children’s Palm Sunday Celebration for 1st-6th graders and an Easter Egg Hunt for preschoolers-Kindergarteners on Palm Sunday, April 14, following worship. Families will meet in the Fellowship Hall for a pizza lunch followed by an Easter egg hunt for the younger kids or fun activities to learn about Holy Week for our older children. RSVP to emily@woodhaven.org.

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Jesus Sculpture

Lead Me to the Cross

Jesus Sculpture
Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of Lent, the 40 weekdays leading up to Easter. Lent is a season of reflection and preparation before the celebration of Easter. By observing the 40 days of Lent, Christians follow Jesus’ pattern of fasting and reflection in the desert for 40 days.
Fasting is a common Lenten discipline due to Jesus’ example in the desert and in recognition of the instructions on fasting that Jesus relayed to His followers (e.g., Matthew 6:16-18). Whereas Easter celebrates the resurrection of Jesus after His death on the cross, Lent recalls the events leading up to and including Jesus’ crucifixion.
Observing a period of reflection in preparation for our remembrance of Jesus’ sacrifice for us on Good Friday is certainly an appropriate Christian practice. Woodhaven has printed some copies of the Lenten Devotional Guide prepared by students of Baylor University’s George W. Truett Theological Seminary. They’re available in the lobby outside the sanctuary. If you prefer to read online, you can download the guide here.
 

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Jar of colorful jelly beans spilling onto Jelly Bean Prayer card

Introducing Kids to Lent

Jar of colorful jelly beans spilling onto Jelly Bean Prayer card

This season, let’s welcome our children into our observance of Lent. Traditionally, we “give up” something for the 40 days of Lent. But 40 days is a long time for a child and they (as well as the grown-ups) may easily tire of and even forget what they’re doing and why they’ve given something up.  

I’m offering our Woodhaven children the opportunity to participate in a special activity that will last throughout the Lenten season. On Ash Wednesday, children will receive a jar, a copy of the jelly bean prayer, and some jelly beans. The children can put their jar in a prominent place at home along with the jelly bean prayer. Parents can hang onto the jelly beans and place one in the child’s jar for each activity or behavior that the child practices.

The children won’t eat the jelly beans until Easter. No white jelly beans are given for behavior, since the white jelly beans represent God’s grace, which is a gift from God and cannot earned.   

Here’s the secret part: on Easter morning, the kids will find that their jars are filled up where they were still empty or lacking with white jelly beans (symbolizing God’s grace). Parents, please make sure you have enough white jelly beans to completely fill your child’s jar on Easter morning.

Here’s the prayer and what each color jelly bean represents:
  • Red is for the blood Christ gave (each morning the child can chose something to sacrifice that day to earn the red jellybean.  It should be something they would have had the opportunity to have or do that day).
  • Green is for the palm’s cool shade. (Green jelly beans are earned for doing good deed each day. It was a good deed to provide shade for Jesus with the palm.)
  • Yellow is for God’s light so bright. (Yellow jelly beans are earned for sharing God’s light through kindness to others.)
  • Orange is for prayers at twilight. (Orange jelly beans are earned for saying a bedtime prayer and reading a nighttime Bible story.)
  • Black is for sweet rest at night. (These jelly beans are earned for going to bed—without complaint and reminders.)
  • Purple is for Jesus’ days of sorrow. (These are earned by apologizing to anyone we hurt with our words or actions that day.)
  • Pink is for each new tomorrow. (Pink jelly beans are earned when we forgive those who apologize to us for hurtful behavior.)
  • Blue is for the joy of knowing Jesus. (These can be earned by singing a favorite Bible song!)
  • White is for the Grace of Christ and cannot be earned.

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Person having ash cross drawn on forehead

Do You Do Lent?

Person having ash cross drawn on forehead

I still consider myself to be learning about Lent. Growing up as a Baptist in the rural south, Lent was not a part of my faith tradition for much of my life. On the rare occasions Lent came up in the Baptist circles I traveled in during my younger days, the discipline was typically dismissed as an unbiblical, Roman Catholic practice.

While in some ways I feel like I’m still trying to get the hang of Lent (even though I’ve been practicing Lent for many years now), I have come to embrace the discipline. Read more…


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